Pavel Tchelitchew

From Pencil: Pavel Tchelitchew (Па́вел Фёдорович Чели́щев) (1898 - 1957) was a surrealist painter, set designer and costume designer. He left Russia in 1920, lived in Berlin until 1923, and moved to Paris, where he became acquainted with Gertrude Stein and the Sitwell and Gorer families. His first U.S. show was of his drawings, along with other artists, at the newly opened Museum of Modern Art in 1930. In 1934, he moved from Paris to New York City. From 1940 to 1947, he provided illustrations for the Surrealist magazine View. He became a United States citizen in 1952 and died in Grottaferrata, Italy in 1957.

From Pencil: Pavel Tchelitchew (Па́вел Фёдорович Чели́щев) (1898 - 1957) was a surrealist painter, set designer and costume designer. He left Russia in 1920, lived in Berlin until 1923, and moved to Paris, where he became acquainted with Gertrude Stein and the Sitwell and Gorer families. His first U.S. show was of his drawings, along with other artists, at the newly opened Museum of Modern Art in 1930. In 1934, he moved from Paris to New York City. From 1940 to 1947, he provided illustrations for the Surrealist magazine View. He became a United States citizen in 1952 and died in Grottaferrata, Italy in 1957.

 

From Writer, Artist ADI DA SAMRAJ:

The dead are rotted.
And they are not art.
They are all the dead,
the objects of your ritual.
And they are not preserved.

Am I right?

And you are the dead--
about to be.
You are all waiting for it.
You are all going to die.
And it will not release anything.
You will be eaten.

You are all biding your time with this ritual of museumistic philosophy--thinking and painting and drawing and musicking and lyricking. Poetry and politics--an involvement in action and repetition and experience.

Until, one day, completely out of the blue, whenever it will occur--at twenty, or thirty, forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety, a hundred, a hundred and fifty years, whenever it occurs--out of the blue, you will get this stuffy sensation in your chest, and your mind will become unavailable to you, and your personality will become magnificently obsolete, and you will puke yourself out and become nothing.

And, for a moment, you will fulfill the Law with your bodies. But, in the next moment, all of you will be stretched out, with a little cord of Light. It is the only thing that keeps this body alive--with three parts, into the three stations of the bodily apparent heart.

And you will stand up in the room, and see your dead body, and feel so relieved from it. And that will seem like the fulfillment of the whole gesture of your understanding.

But, then, you will turn around, and somebody like your mother, your uncle, the Virgin Mary, Jesus of Galilee, Gautama Sakyamuni, Swami Muktananda--somebody will be standing there saying, "Ah, hey, it's alright! You have died now, but you are not your body. Now, come with me, and we'll go into the other world."

And you will believe it. And, actually, you should have been swept out centuries before, lives before, moments before your death. How unfortunate to have had to die in order to be relieved from your body.

But, actually, you have not been relieved from your body-identification, only from the body itself. And, in the next moment, having submitted to this argument, this preacher of your own mind, you will be swifted into some place with all kinds of smiling, white-shirted people, whose entire business it is to make you feel as comfortable--as consoled and dead--as you could possibly be.

And, then, you will be put to sleep, and you will dream for endless years.

Adi Da

Art Enthusiast Favorite: Artist Miya Ando

Miya Ando, Perception 4, 2015

Urethane and pigment on aluminum, 12 × 12 in, 30.5 × 30.5 cm

See Artsy's complete Miya Ando page here. 

I first saw Miya Ando's work a few years ago in a Sundaram Tagore email newsletter. I was on their mailing list because at one point had helped with the fabrication of Adi Da's artwork, who had openings at Tagore's Chelsea and Beverly Hills locations in 2010 and 2011. Since that time I had kept an interest in what other work Tagore represented.

Adi Da's 2010 show at Sundaram Tagore in 2010 in NY. 

At Tagore's gallery, 2010. 

At Tagore's gallery, 2010. 

In Tagore's email newsletter I was immediately attracted to the color and feeling in Ando's work. I searched for her online and this was the first piece I found: 

 

Miya Ando

Urushi Light Blue, 2014

Sundaram Tagore Gallery

I was writing a short story called Night Surfing and this piece became my totem for the work. I felt it captured exactly the feeling I had been meditating on and was thrilled. I put her piece on my Tumblr art blog and it started to get reblogged right away. At the time I remember her  work made me think of Danny Fuller's time lapsed ocean photos. He is a surfer I grew up with on Kauai and admired his artistic development. Her stuff also made me think of Eric Cahan's sky images. 

Soon I needed more.  I headed to online art heaven Artsy to look for more of Ando's work. Every single thing I found of hers I liked and resonated with. I am from Marin County and saw her work, Bolinas.

Miya Ando, Morning Bolinas 2014, via Blouin

Miya Ando, Morning Bolinas 2014, via Blouin

 

Her bodhi tree leaf mandalas. Her bio says she'd grown up Buddhist. I had grown up with very strong influences of Tibetan Buddhism and Advaita Vedanta and my mother collects Bodhi leaves. 

Rose Mini Mandala via Artsy

Rose Mini Mandala via Artsy

Ando's work feels happy, healing and elemental. Color is a/the most important feature of art to me because it demonstrates feeling so completely. The nonverbal is powerful. My grandmother, painter Grace Meredith, always emphasized color and getting the exact color that you saw for what you were painting.  I once brought a brown blanket into her house from my car and she was so offended she made me bring the unacceptable color outside at once. 

Today Ando posted this hanabira petal on her Instagram

pic by @studiomiyaando on Instagram

pic by @studiomiyaando on Instagram

There's an equanimity in her work and something about it reminds me of both the elementals of growing up in wild nature, and of sitting in meditation.  There's a stillness accompanying her work that is more than refreshing.  

See Artsy's complete Miya Ando page here. 

 

Broad Museum | Favorites

The Broad is a new contemporary art museum founded by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles.  

Jeff Koons, Balloon Dog (Blue), 1994-2000

El Anatsui, Red Block, 2010

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Obnoxious Liberals, 1982

Charles Ray, Fall '91, 1992

Cy Twombly Nini's Painting (Rome), 1971 (with sculpture) and Untitled (Rome), 1961

Robert Longo, Untitled (White Riot), 1982

Keith Haring, Untitled, 1984

Mark Tansey, Forward Retreat, 1986

Anselm Kiefer, Am Rhein, 1968-91

Robert Raushenberg, Untitled, 1963

Jeff Koons, Tulips, 1995-2004

John Baldessari, Tips For Artists Who Want To Sell, 1966-68, via postcard at Broad giftshop

His Holiness

This morning we were invited to have breakfast with His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Garden Grove. I was very excited to meet this extraordinary man as my mother is always talking about his goodness and reading his books and posting about him on social media. I had been able to meet the 17th Karmapa Dorje who is mentored by the Dalai Lama, earlier this year and gave him a copy of the book Prior Unity.  

Hosted by the WITH Compassion Foundation, The Dalai Lama spoke to 200 women about compassionate leadership and answered questions. I was most struck by his utter happiness that filled the room as soon as he walked in, and the calm and happy energy pervading the space altogether. His Holiness answered everyone's questions by addressing their question as well as their energy with intelligent love and strong grace.

What a wonderful honor to be there and participate with these women leaders from all over the West Coast. Thank you. 

 

 

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Artist Jon Marro presented a portrait to His Holiness as a gift at the end of the morning.  

 

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He explained the esoteric function of each part of his portrait.  

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My favorite element is the reflection of The Buddha's eyes in the Dalai Lama's glasses.  

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Many thanks to With Compassion for the invite.  

Henri Rousseau | Surprised! + La Grande Odalisque + Nobel Woman + Nasturtium Salad

Henri Rousseau, Surprised! 1891 via National Gallery. 

Henri Rousseau, Surprised! 1891 via National Gallery

Jean-August-Dominique Ingres, La Grande Odalisque, 1814 via The Louvre

Paul Gauguin, Te Arii Vahine (The Nobel Woman), 1892 via Global Gallery

James Rosenquist, Nasturtium Salad, 1984 via The Guggenheim.

Paul Cezanne, The Garden at Les Lauves, 1906 via artsy.

Paul Klee, Tropical Twilight, 1921 via The Art Stack.

Patrick Shoemaker, Fire on Fire, 2014 via Philip Bloom Gallery.

Gabriel Orozco, Quatro Parques via Artsy

Andrea Pinheiro- Intangible Records (mica), 2015

Andrea Pinheiro, Intangible Records (Mica), 2015

Andrea Pinheiro, Intangible Records (Mica), 2015

To see more inspired by Andrea Pinheiro click here.

Gold leaf hair: NYFW 2016. Geode and irregular diamond ring: Kimberly Mcdonald, Moda Operandi. Pastel eyelet dress: Valentino ready to wear 2015.  Shimmer table: Patricia Urquiola.  Chain-Back dress: Valentino ready to wear 2016.  Apple extra-large Mobile, Fort Makers, Aha Life.  Salmon Suede Shoes, Gucci. Blue-green kyanite bracelet: Lauren Wolf Jewelry, Gilt.  L-Space Chloe Top, L-Space, Anthropologie.  

Gold leaf hair: NYFW 2016. Geode and irregular diamond ring: Kimberly Mcdonald, Moda Operandi. Pastel eyelet dress: Valentino ready to wear 2015.  Shimmer table: Patricia Urquiola.  Chain-Back dress: Valentino ready to wear 2016.  Apple extra-large Mobile, Fort Makers, Aha Life.  Salmon Suede Shoes, Gucci. Blue-green kyanite bracelet: Lauren Wolf Jewelry, Gilt.  L-Space Chloe Top, L-Space, Anthropologie.